ACD Tree and Shrub Sale

The Anoka Conservation District (ACD) had our Tree and Shrub pick-up on April 25th at our office in Ham Lake. To comply with safe distancing because of COVID-19, the ACD created a drive through pick up so customers did not have to get out of their vehicles. The District sold over 20,500 trees this year. ACD offers trees for three primary reasons; 1) soil and energy conservation planting, 2) wildlife habitat plantings, and 3) native ecosystem restoration. If you would like to get on the contact list for next year's sale please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. your first and last name, telephone number and email address. Customers who ordered the prior year are auto added to the contact list.  

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Spurge Euphorbia esula MN Noxious Weed: Prohibited – Control

  • 1-2 foot tall
  • Greenish-yellow flower bracts
  • Simple and opposite leaves
  • A white, milky sap exudes if the stem or leaves are cut
  • Grows in full to part sun in range of soil types and moisture

If you see leafy spurge, please report it on EDDMaps: www.eddmaps.org/

For more information and control methods see:

https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/invasives/terrestrialplants/herbaceous/leafyspurge.html

https://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants/pestmanagement/weedcontrol/noxiouslist/leafyspurge

Biological control is an option for reducing large infestations of leafy spurge. Adult leafy spurge beetles (Aphthona lacertosa) feed on the leaves and lay eggs at the base of spurge plants. Larvae feed on the roots over the winter until they pupate and emerge as adults the following summer. See: https://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants/pestmanagement/weedcontrol/noxiouslist/leafyspurge/leafyspurge

Photo at Anoka Nature Preserve. 7.3.2019
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28 Hits

Clean Water Begins at your Curb

ACD, as a member of the Metro Watershed Partners Steering Committee, collaborated with Twin Cities Public Television to produce a 90 second interstitial to promote the Adopt-a-Drain program about how our storm drains and waterways are connected. This animated video, "Clean Water Begins at your Curb," first aired on TPT LIFE on April 24th and will continue to air throughout the summer.

Watch the video online here: https://www.tpt.org/clean-water-begins-curb/


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2020 St. Croix Virtual Workshops on the Water - for local community leaders

REGISTER TODAY

We'd like to invite you and your local community leaders to join us for a series of short educational webinars during the month of June. Presentation topics will include lakeshore and riverway rules, wildlife of the Lower St. Croix watershed, and policies to protect pollinators. Our partners in Washington County partners have collaborated to hold an annual St. Croix Workshop on the Water for the past 10 years. In light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, they are offering this year's workshop as a series of free webinars instead.

This year's St. Croix Virtual Workshops on the Water are offered in partnership by EMWREP, MN DNR, Washington County, and St. Croix River Association.

Lake and Shoreline Management: June 3, 2-3pm

*Offered in place of the June water consortium meeting

  • Who's in charge? Understanding the different roles of state and local government - Jay Riggs, WCD
  • Common scenarios: Can I do that with my property? - Angie Hong, EMWREP
  • Vegetative removal and land alteration standards along shorelines - Matt Bauman - MN DNR

Landscaping and Habitat: June 10, 2-3pm

  • Planting for clean water and wildlife - Angie Hong, EMWREP
  • Policies to protect pollinators - Laurie Schneider, Pollinator Friendly Alliance
  • St. Croix virtual wildlife safari - Greg Seitz, St. Croix 360

St. Croix Riverway: June 17, 2-3pm

  • St. Croix Riverway land use regulations – Dan Petrik and Matt Bauman, MN DNR
  • Ideas for innovative local shoreland, floodplain, and St. Croix land use ordinances – Dan Petrik and Matt Bauman, MN DNR

Register online to reserve your spot.

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19 Hits

Save Money and Water!

Spring is here. If you have an irrigation system for your yard, you likely already have it up and running or are considering doing so within the next month. Now is the time when you're setting the watering duration and frequency for each zone in your yard. These settings often remain unchanged throughout the season, which typically results in over-watering. Over-watering wastes drinkable water, and assuming you don't have a private well, it also wastes money.

This year, in addition to following city restrictions (e.g. odd/even watering schedules), try actively managing your irrigation controller. Active management consists of adjusting run times based on local conditions. For example, during periods with sufficient rainfall, watering duration and frequency can be reduced. During these times, you can simply turn your irrigation system off. In contrast, during periods of extreme heat and drought, supplemental watering may be necessary. Watch your yard for signs of drought before turning on your irrigation system, and rely on rainfall as much as possible. When you need to use your irrigation system, water your lawn one time or less per week with a good soaking to encourage deeper root growth, and schedule watering times in the morning to reduce evaporation associated with midday heat and wind.

An alternative to active management is a smart irrigation controller. Smart irrigation controllers use an internet connection to actively monitor local precipitation patterns and automatically adjust watering frequency and duration accordingly. Regardless of whether you choose active management or a smart irrigation controller, both are effective options for reducing water use and saving money.

Visit the University of Minnesota Extension's Lawn Care website for additional lawn management resources.

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59 Hits

SWCD Supervisor Elections

Anoka Conservation District Supervisor seats for Districts 1, 4 & 5 will be on the November 2020 ballot. This position is a four-year term and usually requires one to three meetings monthly for which a stipend is provided.

Being a supervisor is an opportunity for people concerned with natural resource management in Anoka County to become involved in policy making at the local, regional, and state levels. Generally, the Board of Supervisors sets the policy and direction of the District and entrusts the staff to follow through.

ACD has a staff of 10+ natural resource management professionals and an annual budget of $1.5M-$2M. ACD is non-regulatory and focuses on providing technical and financial assistance to landowners to implement conservation activities.

The filing period is open from May 19 through June 2, 2020. Interested parties can call Anoka County Elections office a 763-323-5275 for filing information. The filing fee is $20.

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The Season of Spring Erosion (and Help for Those Experiencing It)


The excitement of spring often comes with high water, ice, and waves. This spring is no exception. Owners of property on lakes and rivers are quick to take note. And sometimes, feel a bit helpless. The Anoka Conservation District offers help to those landowners. We've got technical know-how to fix the problems. We focus on approaches that are lasting, create habitat, and improve water quality. The advice is free. As a bonus, financial help in the form of grants are often available.  During the COVID-19 pandemic, our staff are most easily reached by email, however, we are also checking voice messages. For contact information see https://www.anokaswcd.org/index.php/about-us/staff-directory.html

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90 Hits

Rain Guardian Pretreatment Chambers Featured on LIDBIT Vlog

Rain Guardian pretreatment chambers were recently featured in a new vlog focused on low impact development (LID).The vlog is called LIDBit and is coordinated by Rob Woodman with ACF Environmental.In the Rain Guardian episode, Rob interviewed Anoka Conservation District Stormwater and Shoreland Specialist, Mitch Haustein, about Rain Guardian pretreatment chamber functionality, configurations, installation, and maintenance.Check out the Rain Guardian episode and others on the LIDBit Video YouTube channel (https://tinyurl.com/vfmm9fc).

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Sheet Mulching

Sheet mulching – saves time, builds soil, and smothers existing weeds or lawn without using herbicide.

Sheet mulching is an excellent way to convert lawn to garden beds without using herbicides or excessive labor. Meanwhile it can build soil and be accomplished with readily available materials.

Begin by mowing grass or other vegetation in the area you want to convert into a new garden bed. It can be as simple as layers of newspaper or cardboard topped by four inches of mulch to smother grass and weeds underneath. If this is started in the spring, the underlying plants will have died from lack of light and the garden bed will be ready for planting in the fall.A more diverse layering of material will produce a compost that will break down and build your soil. For this, layer:

  1. Soil amendments if soil test results recommend amendments (lime, greensand, etc.). Recommended if you are creating a vegetable garden.
  2. Thin layer of compost.
  3. Wet newspaper or cardboard, 1/4 – 1/2 inch thick.
  4. Thin layer of nitrogen source such as manure.
  5. Layer of straw or leaves (carbon source).
  6. Continue to alternate layers of nitrogen and carbon sources.
  7. End with a top layer of mulch.

This type of bed is finished when these layers have decomposed. It may take the entire growing season to decompose sufficiently. If you start in the spring, the bed will likely be ready to plant in the fall.

See the Xerces Society Organic Site Preparation for Wildflower Establishment publication for more organic site preparation methods and directions:

https://xerces.org/publications/guidelines/organic-site-preparation-for-wildflower-establishment

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54 Hits

Trees for Bees (and other pollinators)

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169 Hits

Oak Wilt

Oak Wilt is becoming an increasing problem throughout the State and kills off a large number of oaks every year. Even though oak wilt is active in a large area of Minnesota, effective management techniques exist.

Oak wilt in a healthy tree will begin wilting the canopy. This usually starts at the top of the tree and spreads downward. The tree then sheds leaves, which will begin individually wilting at the edges and spread towards the midrib of the leaf or at the leaf tip and wilt towards the stem. A discoloration or streaking of the wood just below the bark may also be present.

In Red Oaks, the deterioration process can take as little as 4 weeks. In White Oaks, the disease may come back every year but death of the tree could take up to 5 years or longer after the initial symptoms appear.

Healthy oak trees are usually infected by the fungus's ability to move underground through the roots of nearby trees that have grafted together. In general, trees more than 50 feet apart are less likely to be infected through grafted roots. Sap beetles also transport the disease above ground by moving from an infected tree to a healthy one.

Stopping the spread of oak wilt is possible. Breaking root connections between closely spaced oaks will reduce the chance of the disease spreading from infected trees to nearby healthy ones. This takes a specialized piece of equipment and can be difficult to achieve. This is way preventing infection in the first place is the recommended best management practice.

Even though the nice weather makes you want to head outside and work on your property, you should avoiding pruning and wounding healthy oaks in the spring and summer. Between April and July, oak trees are at a much higher risk of infection by sap beetles who are attracted to fresh wounds in the bark of oak trees and may be carrying the fungus. Oak trees should be assessed for storm damage and any wound should immediately be sealed with a water-based paint of another type of plant sealer.

Other techniques to stop the spread of oak wilt include; avoid moving firewood from known infected areas, timely removal and disposal of infected trees, and the use of fungicide when necessary. Many times multiple approaches are necessary to slow or eradicate the problem. Meeting with a local tree care providers can help create a management plan that will be effective on your property.

If you have more questions or are concerned about Oak Trees in your area, contact a local professional to inquire about what can be done on your property. Early detection is still the best method of control.

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Trim Oak Trees now to Prevent the Spread of Oak Wilt


Oak wilt is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum. Oak wilt can be spread in two ways: 1) fungal spores travelling tree to tree through grafted roots, and 2) fungal spores spread by sap beetles that fly from infected trees or wood to healthy trees. The beetles are attracted to fresh wounds in healthy trees, and these wounds offer an introduction point for the fungus.Trimming or cutting healthy oaks from the months of November through March helps to prevent fresh wounds in healthy trees when the beetles are active. Trimming away dead and dying branches during this period can help prevent oak wilt spreading from neighboring areas to your trees. If your oak trees still need trimming before this spring, be sure to do it before the end of March. April 1 through July 15 is considered the high risk period, and all trimming of oaks should be avoided. July 15 through October 31 is considered low risk, but spread is still possible. Red oaks and pin oaks are especially susceptible to oak wilt, and once infected, a healthy tree is killed within ​months.

Unfortunately, oak wilt is very common in Anoka County. More information on prevention of the disease in your yard can be found at https://extension.umn.edu/plant-diseases/oak-wilt-minnesota
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94 Hits